ID:2051839
 
So, what are you all working on outside BYOND? Think of this like the "SHOW ME WHAT YOU GOT." thread, but for your non-BYOND projects. Or at least, those non-BYOND projects you don't think are quite worth their own post yet.
I'll start!

I'm a worldbuilding and conlanging nerd, and I've been updating a page my one setting's Google Sites page, to make a few things more to my liking and to make some other things better organized and more pleasing to the eye. While doing this, I discovered that a gloss I was working on months ago that I thought I'd finished was actually incomplete. Interlinear glosses are a method that linguists use to show a sort of 'piece-by-piece' translation of a text or utterance or what have you. As it happens, since this gloss is incomplete I'm in the interesting position of having to re-discover the meaning of words in this particular conlang that I wrote months ago. I'm pretty sure that somewhere I have a complete pen-and-paper gloss of the full text, but unfortunately I have absolutely no idea where it is.

The text in question is,

Priest:    Faljrxte, apjtn onc-zulnco, tralc ẓ tultic! Usjc
           lucsml f tasjr amnrismjil uzc.
Audience:  Faljrxte, amnsẓo uzc.
Priest:    Usjc lucsml f tasjr lrismjil uzc, f tasjr
           nạrismjl uzc.
Audience:  Faljrxte, nạsj uzc.
Priest:    Usjc lucsml f tasjr nạrismjl Pacljex z sạ́j
           curjilfeẓol amr uzc apjoret rlesoret nr.
Audience:  Faljrxte, nạsj uzc.
Priest:    Usjc lucsml f tasjr nạrismjl Sultjpex z
           peẓjil amir cojtpro't plaorula uzm crtart apjorsạn.
Audience:  Faljrxte, nạsj uzc.
Priest:    Usjc lucsml f tasjr nạrismjl Zjaxtex z emạtc
           plar uecrt nr op usjc cojtpro lạẓmurl amr.
Audience:  Faljrxte, nạsj uzc.
Priest:    Usjc lucsml f tasjr nạrismjl Ajlx z sạj talepro
           uzc sap nulojur paclajmula uzmc ṭoro laflje'ula uzmc.
Audience:  Faljrxte, nạsj uzc.
Priest:    Usjc lucsmil fi tasjir nạmal Curxsx z usjc olro sjinoro
           curjimaril am sap uṭ placlol op usjc sjipro zaxomaril am.
Audience:  Faljrxte, nạsj uzc.
Priest:    Usjc lucsmil fi tasjir namil onc-Luojmur z sạj xufanc
           nạṭamarela tax ạclmitil am.
Audience:  Faljrxte, nasje uzc.

modulo a few characters this site refuses to display even with HTML entities. The translated text, meanwhile, is
Priest:    O Faljrx, warrior exemplar, brave and strong! We humbly ask
           for your pity.
Audience:  Faljrx, pity us.
Priest:    We humbly ask that you intercede for us, that you pray for us.
Audience:  Faljrx, pray for us.
Priest:    We humbly ask that you pray to Paclj, that he may make us
           his sword in this coming battle.
Audience:  Faljrx, pray for us.
Priest:    We humbly ask that you pray to Sultjp, that his eyes do not
           see our deaths on the battlefield.
Audience:  Faljrx, pray for us.
Priest:    We humbly ask that you pray to Zjaxt, that if we are to die
           today we may be shown his favor.
Audience:  Faljrx, pray for us.
Priest:    We humbly ask that you pray to Ajl, that he may carry us if
           the burden of our evils sink our spirit.
Audience:  Faljrx, pray for us.
Priest:    We humbly ask that you pray to Curxs, that if we must feel his
           knife in death that we also feel his mercy.
Audience:  Faljrx, pray for us.
Priest:    We humbly ask that you plead to the High God, that he hears your
           prayers to each of his masks.
Audience:  Faljrx, plead for us.
Priest:    O High God! As your lowly servant, I beg of you for these of
           your followers before me, hear Faljrx's pleas and grant them.
Audience:  High God, grant us pity.
Together:  May it be willed.

The text was not quite finished yet, but that is not really an issue.

The last three "Priest" lines and the last "Audience" lines are the ones that are the problem here. Effectively, what I've done for myself is set up a Rosetta Stone situation, so it should be interesting to see if my ~7 years of amateur linguistics study have been effective enough for me to do this without reworking it entirely.

As an aside, I managed to lose the contents of this page freakin' twice while writing it. Seriously annoying.
So, no one has outside projects they're working on? Or at least, none they want to talk about?

I finally finished translating the text I had in the previous post. I haven't worked on it 100% over the past few days, but even those few sentences left still took several hours of work, as this language is still quite in its early stages. The full text is,

Priest    Faljárxte, apjútnë onc-zulníco, tralëcó ë́ẓ tulétic! Usjë́c
          lucsëmíl fí tasjír amnírismjil ulsë́c.
Audience  Faljárxte, amnírisẓjo ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír þúlrismjil uzë́c, fí tasjír
          nạþrismjál ulsë́c.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisjé ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrismjál Pacljéþex ë́z sạ́j
          curéjilfeẓol amír uzë́c apjéþoret rélesoret nír.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisjé ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrismjál Sultjépex ë́z
          ípeẓjil amir cojátpro 't pëlaþorula uzë́m crétart
          apjéþorsạn.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisjé ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrismjál Zjaxótex ë́z emạtë́c
          pëlaró uþecárt nír opú usjë́c cojátpro lạẓmuríl amír.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisjé ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrismjál Aþjúlëx ë́z sạ́j
          átalepro uzë́c sáp nulþojúr pacólajmula uzëmë́c ṭoró
          lafúljula uzëmë́c.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisjé ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrismjál Curxésëx ë́z usjë́c
          ísjinoro curéjimaril ám sáp pëlaclól opú usjë́c ísjipro
          úṭ zaxóþomaril ám.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisjé ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír þúnamil onc-Luþojmúr ë́z sạ́j
          xufánc nạþṭamarelá táx ạcólmitil ám.
Audience  Faljárxte, þúnarisje ulsë́c.
Priest    Onc-Luþojtéj elë́j jạ́ þoþmíl cólutjicmirela taxír
          ṭepésëmil cí tarír mạ́st iþaẓutëþẓelá taxír, jạ́ mạ́c
          injémil ín ë́ẓ rjéx xufpró þúnaþorjejl Faljárxsạrn ë́ẓ
          rácprjo xúlrë!
Audience  Onc-Luþojrí rácrjisje uzë́c amníþorfjërela taxír.
Together  Calír núsrjisprjo nilmír.


The full details of the translation can be found here. If someone hadn't borrowed my headset and then proceed to lose it, I would've tried to upload at least a partial sample of the text to give an idea for how it sounds (though some parts I have trouble saying). I mean, I could also give an IPA transcription, but I doubt many people here can read IPA.

Hopefully at some point, bits and pieces of this will show up in a story I'd like to write! Mostly little things, though, like names. While it does serve some purpose in that regard, mostly constructed language stuff is just for my own entertainment.
No one on BYOND is competent enough to do anything but make the base.
Thats really interesting.

Sadly I have no projects outside of BYOND. Busy with university :$

I guess all I can add to this is Keep it up!! :)
That turns my linguist gears something fierce, Pop.

Usjc

ulsë́c

Is this a conjugation? This looks an awful lot like a grammar rule stolen from spanish. Is this something like Usted. form?

The grammar really feels very latin inspired, which is interesting. It looks like you've shifted the grammar very little from english to make it more of a simple lex.

I was always interested more in the grammar structure and conjugation side of linguistics than the syllable structure.

I actually modeled a Dwarven language for an RPG off of a combination of Gallic, Chinese, and Korean. 13 consonants and seven vowels. I banned dipthongs and fricative sounds. Elision was also banned to simplify the reading process. All vowels were devoice where possible, and I tried to create mostly bilabial and rear sounds.

I spent a few weeks coming up with the spoken language and then tried to represent the sounds using a two-symbol combination by representing glottal and mouth actions as shapes and then combining them into graphemes to create syllables. I then chose to make the language tonal by creating a set of punctuations to give variance to the way that they were read.

Threats were read with drawn lips, sarcasm with extra aspiration, mocking would introduces fricative speech into the language to indicate the soft sounds of elves, and pronouncements and orders used the diaphragm to induce resonance. Nasal aspiration was also used for questions, but questions were more often re-expressed as orders.

I completely eliminated the need for grammar and stuck to a simplistic set of numerics and scientific language. The only form of poetry the language expressed was through ambiguity and encoding. Poetry was written by writing multigrams or ambigrams. Sentences were normally read top to bottom, but poetry would be written by creating sentences with layered meanings by matching graphemes left to right as well as top to bottom to create meanings and clever literary writing was often expressed with cryptic gibberish being encoded into blocks of graphemes using runic shapes to determine reading order.

The language was pretty neat. Too bad my players weren't as interested in it as I was. =(
In response to Ter13
Ter13 wrote:
Is this a conjugation? This looks an awful lot like a grammar rule stolen from spanish. Is this something like Usted. form?

This language—like all my other constructed languages and attempts—is a priori, meaning that it is not based on any existing language. Consequently, any similarities are coincidences.

The grammar really feels very latin inspired, which is interesting. It looks like you've shifted the grammar very little from english to make it more of a simple lex.

I'd dispute both, as once again it is a priori. I personally can't see any similarity to Latin, except maybe as far as the fact that both Early Heartlandic and Latin are topologically fusional—but that is extremely common cross-linguistically. As for calling it a relex of English, that's honestly kind of insulting. Admittedly, being an English monolingual, some semantic influence has crept in without doubt, but morphologically and syntactically the language is very different, and I've put in a considerable amount of effort in that regard. Did you happen to look at the gloss provided?

If you don't know how to read that, then I'll provide it here (for the first few lines) and give an explanation of the components.

Priest    faljárx -te,         apjé   -ut  -në         disabledc=  zulní
          faljárx -SG.VOC.PRS, combat -AGT -SG.VOC.PRS SUPL= perfect

          -co,         tral  -ë    -co         ëẓ  tulét  -ic!
          -SG.VOC.PRS, brave -EPIN -SG.VOC.PRS and strong -SG.VOC.PRS!

          usj      -ëc   luc -së   -mil       fi tasj  -ir  amní -risj
          1P.ER.EX -huml ask -HUML -PR.PF.IND C  2S.ER -POL pity -POL

          -mil       uls        -ëc.
          -PR.PF.IND 1P.BENF.EX -HUML.

Audience  faljárx -te,         amní -risj -ẓo        uls        -ëc.
          faljárx -SG.VOC.PRS, pity -POL  -PR.PF.IMP 1P.BENF.EX -HUML.


  • Faljárx is a highly-revered warrior figure in the mythology of this region, whose most notable tale involves him saving the three tools used to create man from the evil figure who rediscovered them (who also shows up several times in the mythology, but is yet unnamed), a servant of the primordial chaos and devil-like figure. He is used as an Intercessor of warriors and soldiers, among others. Intercessors are a common aspect of worship in this region, as the Temple holds that non-priests and non-nobility are not (generally) ritually clean enough to pray to the High God and his Aspects; thus, the Intercessor does the prayer on their behalf.
  • -te is a declensional affix (Nouns are declined, while verbs are conjugated. Both are forms of inflection) indicating the singular number, vocative case, and person noun class/gender. The vocative case is used for direct address of a noun, as occurs here.
  • -ut is suffix to form a deverbal noun—that is, a noun derived from a verb. Here, it turns a verb into an "agent noun". Agent is a thematic relation, which is a useful theoretical tool. It basically indicates one who deliberately performs an action, much like the -er suffix in English (though these are fairly common). Thus, apjút- is a stem (after applying sandhi rules) that marks something that could be translated to warrior, soldier, combatant, fighter or similar depending on the context.
  • -në is a declensional affix indicating singular number, vocative case, and person noun class/gender. Because apjút- is in a different declension group than Faljárx-, it takes a different suffix.
  • disabledc= is a superlative clitic that appears before the noun it modifies. Superlatives can translate as "most" or "-est" in English, while a clitic is a morpheme that is syntactically independent but phonologically dependent on another word or phrase. In this case, its stress pattern depends on the noun it modifies.
  • -co once again, declensional affix indicating singular number, vocative case, and person noun class/gender. In this case, it's an affix used for adjectives rather than a different noun class.
  • is an epenthetic vowel. Essentially, /lk/ is not an allowed consonant cluster, so appears to break it up.
  • ëẓ is a conjunction used to join certain phrases (e.g., noun phrases). Can be translated as "and" into English.
  • -ic is another declensional affix for singular, vocative, and person. This adjective is in a different class than the previous two, so takes a different suffix.
  • usj is a pronoun indiating first person, plural number, ergative case, and is also exclusive.

    This langauge has a tripartite or ergative-accusative morphosyntactic alignment meaning that the subject of an intransitive verb is treated differently than both the agent-like and patient-like arguments of a transitive verb. These types of languages are rare, cross-linguistically, and most languages are either nominative-accusative (the subject of an intransitive verb is treated like the agent-like argument of a transitive verb) or ergative-absolutive (where the subject of an intransitive verb is treated like the patient-like argument of a transitive verb). Nominative-accusative languages include English and most Indo-European languages (and is the most common morphosyntactic alignment), while ergative-accusative languages include Basque and a few Indo-Aryan languages.

    The ergative case here basically indicates that—in classical English grammar terms—the argument is the subject of a transitive verb.

    Exclusive means that the pronoun excludes the person or people the speaker is talking to. It could be translated as "we, but not you" or something like that in English.
  • -ëc is a humility/humbleness marker, which is part of the politeness system of the language.
  • -së is another humility/humbelness marker, albeit one that is affixed to a verb instead of a noun or pronoun.
  • -mil is a conjugational affix indicating present tense, perfective aspect, and indicative mood. Present tense is simple enough, while the perfective aspect indicates an action that is already completed (within the context of the statement), and the indicative mood is a grammatical mood used to indicate statements that the speaker believes are true, real, or factual.
  • fi is a complementizer, which is a particle used to introduce a complementary phrase. A complementary phrase acts as the argument of a verb. For example, that in the phrase "I hate that you're so talented." is a complementizer, and head of the complementary phrase that you're so talented.
  • tasj is a second person, singular pronoun in the ergative case.
  • -ir is a politeness marker applied to nouns and pronouns. Once again, part of the language's politeness system.
  • -risj is a politeness marker applied to verbs. The reason it rather than a humility marker is used is because in this case the agent of the verb (the "subject") is an authority figure or one that the one speaking respects or wishes to show deference to.
  • uls is a second personal plural pronoun in the benefactive case. This case is used to mark a noun or pronoun that benefits from some action, and could be translated as "for [the benefit of] x" or something similar.
  • -ẓo is a conjugational affix marking the present tense, perfective aspect, and imperative mood. The imperative mood is used to denote commands or orders, though the use of a politeness marker basically says something akin to "we respectfully request you do this thing".


I think it's pretty clear this is not a relex.

As an aside, there are a few things here I plan on changing. E.g., nạþ- in the phrase "Faljárxte, nạþrisjé ulsë́c." should really be in the antipassive voice rather than the active voice, as the object is deleted. As it stands, it is non-grammatical and more of how it would be declined if you had something like "Nạþrisjé Faljárxmir." Pray (humbly) to Faljárx. I also think I'll probably change it to future tense and possively progressive aspect, and in the given context that makes more sense.
... I think I'm triggering some sort of regex? disabledc=?
More update on my work. I hope some other people add to the thread so it doesn't just end up as me rambling about my language and worldbuilding shit.

I did some serious revisions on the prayer I've been meddling with, to make a lot of grammatical and semantic changes that are more sensical within the context of the language. I also got around to titling the prayer in the language (which was not difficult, as all the components are already there in the prayer for the most part, and I just had to put them together). The title in Early Heartlandic/Cólþạrcic is Þúnaþorcis apjúzesj, which is literally "The Pleadings of the Soldiers", but a more natural translation—and what I've been using, though it appears I didn't remark on it here—is "The Soldier's Plea".

The new revision is,
Priest    Faljárxte, apjútnë onc-zulníco, tralcó ë́ẓ tulétco! Usjë́c
          lucsëmíl fí tasjír amnírisprjo ulsë́c.
Audience  Faljárxte, amnírisxjuc ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír þúlriþẓjạl ulsë́c, fí tasjír
          nạþriþẓjạ́l ulsë́c.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisxjúlþ ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrisjpró Pacljéþṭëc ë́z sạ́j
          núsjumë uzë́c curéjcujil amír apjéþortesj rélesoret nír.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisxjúlþ ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmil fí tasjír nạþrisjpró Sultjépmis ë́z ípeẓjil amír
          cojátpro-'t pëlaþorạ́sula uzë́m apjéþorëpcrétjëþ.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisxjúlþ ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrisjpró Zjaxótmis ë́z emạtë́c pëlaró
          uþecárt nír opú usjë́ccojátpro lạẓmuríl amír.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisxjúlþ ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrisjpró Aþjúlmis ë́z sạ́j átalepro
          uzë́c jạ́ nulþojúr pacólpejrula uzëmë́c ṭoró lafúlạsula uzëmë́c.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisxjúlþ ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír nạþrisjpró Curxésmis ë́z usjë́c
          ísjinoro curéjimaril ám lạjzjo jạ́ usjë́c pëlanújx opú usjë́c
          cóltpro zaxóþomaril ám.
Audience  Faljárxte, nạþrisxjúlþ ulsë́c.
Priest    Usjë́c lucsëmíl fí tasjír þúnapro Luþojmís ë́z sạ́j xufpró
          nạþorạselá táx ạcólpejsjil ám.
Audience  Faljárxte, þúnarisxjulþ ulsë́c.
Priest    Luþojtéj! Eléj jạ́ þoþmíl cólutjicmirela taxír ṭepésëmil cí
          tarír mạ́st iþaẓutëþẓelá taxír, jạ́ mạ́c injéti ín ë́z rjéx xufpró
          þúnaþorạsil Faljárxsạrn ë́ẓ rácjolpë mót!
Audience  Luþojtéj! Rácrjisxjúlþ uzë́c amníþortecil rusír.
Together  Calír núsrjisprjo nilmír ulsë́c.


A more literal translation than I give in this post is as follows,
Priest    O Faljrx! most perfect soldier, brave and strong! We do
          humbly ask that you kindly pity us.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you pity us for our benefit.
Priest    We humbly ask that you kindly itercede for our benefit, that
          you kindly pray for our benefit.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you pray for our benefit.
Priest    We humbly ask that you would pray to Paclj so he will make
          us his sword in this approaching battle.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you pray for our benefit.
Priest    We humbly ask that you would pray to Sultjp so his eyes may
          not see our dying on the battlefield.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you pray for our benefit.
Priest    We humbly ask that you would pray to Zjaxt so if we die this
          day then we may see his favor.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you pray for our benefit.
Priest    We humbly ask that you would pray to Ajl so he may carry us
          when the weight of our evils might sink our spirits.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you pray for our benefit.
Priest    We humbly ask that you would pray to Curxs so if we feel his
          blade at the time we have died, then we may experience his
          mercy.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you pray for our benefit.
Priest    We humbly ask that you would plead with the High God so he
          hears your prayers to his masks.
Audience  O Faljrx, kindly will you plead for our benefit.
Priest    O High God! I, who am your most lowly servant, do beg for the
          benefit of them, your followers who are standing before me, so
          you would hear the pleadings of Faljrx and may grant them!
Audience  O High God, kindly will you grant, for our benefit, his
          pleadings.
Together  May he kindly do this, for our benefit.


The "for our benefit" parts could also be translated as "on our behalf", depending on the context.

I'm also gonna slowly try and organize my numerous worldbuilding notes and start putting them on my Google Sites page, so at least they're somewhere publicly-facing. Maybe someone other than me will be entertained by them.
Well, now it's not gonna be all about my language and worldbuilding bullshit, even if I am the only contributor to the thread.

Yesterday while driving home from a friend's house yesterday, I had an epiphany that an algebra I had constructed quite some time ago could be generalized by—instead of the process I had initially done—starting with a group of n objects, giving the group operation certain properties, and then generating a vector space over that set and extending the group operation to the vector space in a particular way. You then take the quotient of a certain portion of that algebra, and you get back to what I had.

The construction is specifically as follows. Let β = {e1, ..., en} and let · : β × β → β be a binary operation such that, if Li(x) = ei · x and Ri(x) = x · ei are left- and right multiplication by ei respectively, then the following properties hold.
  1. Li defines a cyclic permutation of one cycle on {e1, ..., ei-1, ei+1, ..., en} with length n-1.
  2. Li(ei) = ei.
  3. For each 1 ≤ i, k ≤ n there is exactly one 1 ≤ j ≤ n such that ei · ej = ek or ej · ei = ek.
  4. For all x in β, Li(x)·ei = x = ei·Ri(x).

To then get an algebra over some field F, you let C be the vector space generated by β over F. You then define a product ·C : C × C → C such that for (a ei) ·C (b ej) = (ab) (ei · ej).

What exactly is meant by "a cyclic permutation of one cycle [...] of length n-1" is basically as follows. Imagine you have an ordered list of n elements (a, b, ..., y, z). You can then define some way to map those elements to re-arrange them. A simple one is saying that 1 → 2, 2 → 3, and so on down the line to n → 1. Then applying that once, you get (z, a, ..., x, y), and applying it twice you get (y, z, ..., w, x), and if you apply it n times you get back to (a, b, ..., x, y). That is, the permutation cycles.

By saying it has one cycle, I mean that you don't do something like saying that 1 → 2 and 2 → 1, while 3 → 4, 4 → 5, and so on down the line to n → 3. In that case, applying once you get (b, a, z, c, ..., x, y), applying it twice you get, (a, b, y, z, ..., w, x), and so on. Basically, (a, b) is doing its own thing, while (c, ..., z) is doing something else. This is disallowed.

To actually get back to the algebra I had messed around with ages ago, you have to do one more step, which is to take the quotient of the set of elements of the form (x, ..., x). E.g., the set {..., (0, ..., 0), (-1, ..., -1), (½, ..., ½), (π, ..., π), ...}, if we're considering this over the real numbers. "Quotient out" basically means we treat those elements like they are all equal to zero (in a formal manner). This set has a few special properties, which is one reason we can do the above.

I have a few conjectures about algebras of this sort (and I also suspect that the third property is implied by the other three, but I'm not sure), but explaining those is a little more difficult. Isomorphism isn't too difficult of a concept, but it's a little harder to grasp sometimes.
Yesterday while driving home from a friend's house yesterday, I had an epiphany that an algebra I had constructed quite some time ago could be generalized by

Ha, nerd!
In response to Kumorii
Kumorii wrote:
Ha, nerd!

I'd like to go to grad school for math, so that's pretty much a minimum requirement.
Finally noticed this thread and thought I would pitch in. While I have already created a dedicated thread for my project outside of BYOND, I might as well bring it up here.

As some already know, I've been working on my trusty virtual computer/machine called ClassicVCom HD. Been in production since April 2015. One of the things I have been working on recently was to get good GPU performance on it. Now it's good enough for now (it can even handle 1080p); the next important step is executing instructions. Cycle exact execution might come around in the near future.

My hopes for this project is to merge gaming from the 80s and mix it with higher resolutions. As some also already know, I extended the color support range from 4-bit to 6-bit to allow for more detail if desired. Heck, higher resolutions should allow for relatively high detail even with a more limited color range (at least around 64 colors). One nifty thing is you can choose colors from a 24-bit to 32-bit selection and store them in a palette/index.

Here's the original thread for it: http://www.byond.com/forum/?post=1861595 (Specifications haven't been updated yet though as I have recently added new plans to them.)
In response to Bandock
Interesting. Do you have pictures or video of what you've been working on in action?
As a matter of fact, I have a recent screenshot of the DOS environment. Haven't recorded a video yet though.



If you want play around with it, I have the latest binary test version out there: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/24250760/ Test%20Releases/ClassicVCom%20HD.zip

There is also an Emscripten-produced Test Version, though it needs to be updated (which hasn't been done yet due to some code incompatibility with some of the runtime for Emscripten). Here is the link anyhow: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/24250760/ Test%20Releases/ClassicVCom_HD/ClassicVCom_HD.html (Some commands are missing)

Here are the commands you can play with:
Cd - Changes directories. You can use two periods to move back a directory, though it needs to be spaced for now. I might make it work like in MS-DOS in the near future.

Clear - Clears the screen.

Del - Deletes a file provided you specify a file type (either FILE or EXE). CONFIG cannot be deleted.

Dir - Views the current directory.

Format - Doesn't work yet, but you do get a message for it.

Mem - Displays current memory.

Mkdir - Creates a directory.

Rmdir - Removes a directory.

Run - Runs programs. This is actually the next phase where it will start executing instructions.

Shutdown - Shuts down the virtual computer/machine.


For assembly, I actually have a partially working assembler for it. However, no instructions are executed yet. Plus, I'm planning on transferring ClassicVDOS to a ROM file (which the virtual machine will eventually use to run the DOS environment).

I have plans of making the project open-source at some point.
So, while I've been able to find a system that works for the above axioms for the cases of n = 2, 3, and 4, I can't find one for five, and I'm starting to have suspicions it won't work for n ≥ 5, though I don't have a proof. I mean, I did prove it can't work for the case of n = 5, but that was essentially by bruteforcing it, which is (a) inelegant as fuck, and (b) leads to no real understanding of why it fails. As it stands, I can't really think of way to proceed with a proof following just from axioms (i) through (iv) as posted before.

It's annoying, interesting, and surprising though. It's very easy to find for the two, three, and four elements, and then it just fails out of the blue for five. Weird.
I've been unable to make progress on proving the previous conjecture, so I posted on the Math StackExchange in the hopes of drawing someone's attention. I might ask my QM professor on Monday if he has any ideas, depending on how much time we have.

Meanwhile, I've continued work on that Google Sites page. I'm still documenting Early Heartlandic, but I've also been expanding it by adding some stub articles on other things I've had details and plans now for a while. For example, I've had fairly in-depth notes on both auroch-elk and wombat-hounds for more than a year now (as I remember writing them over spring break last year while stuck in an airport terminal in Key West).

I've also been working on getting things clarified for my civil war story in the setting, including spending a good chunk of last night drawing up a shitty map to get a better idea of the distances involved. While a very large chunk of my notes apply to this Empire's Golden Age (the Middle Imperial Period), that won't happen until at least 150 to 200 years after this story, and many of the notes for then don't apply for this story. Nevertheless, the story really interests me and is very, very important for how the First High Kingdom eventually becomes the Heartland Empire, so it's worth writing.
Rebuilding Elora in another language, slowly :)

In response to Kozuma3
What's Elora? The thing you've been posting progress pics of in the "SHOW ME WHAT YOU GOT" thread?
In response to Popisfizzy
Popisfizzy wrote:
What's Elora? The thing you've been posting progress pics of in the "SHOW ME WHAT YOU GOT" thread?

Yea, but this is a WIP in VS instead of DM.
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