In response to Kozuma3
Kozuma3 wrote:
Yea, but this is a WIP in VS instead of DM.

VS?
In response to Audeuro
Audeuro wrote:
Kozuma3 wrote:
Yea, but this is a WIP in VS instead of DM.

VS?

He's referring to VyScript, the scripting language of Vylocity. Believe it or not, I've been backing both BYOND and Vylocity in terms of project support.
In response to Bandock
Bandock wrote:
He's referring to VyScript, the scripting language of Vylocity. Believe it or not, I've been backing both BYOND and Vylocity in terms of project support.

Ahh, that makes sense. =p The first thing that pops to mind with "VS" is "Visual Studio," and there's so many different languages associated there that it didn't make much sense there, either.
Yep, I bet others would've thought Visual Studio too. Heck, I even associate VS with Visual Studio.
Apparently I'm unsatisfied with one unresolved math problem, so now I'm looking back at stuff I was working on in the fall semester. Specifically, imagine you draw K random variables X1, ..., XK from a discrete uniform distribution unif(1, T). It's possible to arrange these into what are called order statistics so that X(1) ≤ X(2) ≤ ... ≤ X(K-1) ≤ X(K) where X(1) = min {X1, ..., XK} and X(K) = max {X1, ..., XK} and similarly for the rest. These order statistics will each have a very different distribution from the "regular" random variables X1, ..., XK.

Next, let σ = (σ1, ..., σn) be some sequence of n elements where 1 ≤ n ≤ K such that σi = σj implies that i = j. That is, σ doesn't have repeats. I want to find a (not necessarily closed-form) formula for the probability mass function of Y = X1) + ... + Xn).

What this models can be given by the following example. Imagine you roll four six-sided die and you have some rule where you have to add the two die with the lowest value. For example, if you roll 1, 2, 1, 4, then your result would be 1+1 = 2. If you roll 3, 6, 1, 4, then your result is 1+3 = 4. Then you are essentially (and equivalently) drawing four random variable X1, ..., X4 from the discrete uniform distribution unif(1, 6) and then considering the random variable Y = X(1) + X(2). Likewise, if you do the same but sum the highest three (e.g., rolling 3, 6, 1, 2 means you rolled a 2+3+6 = 11) then you're considering the random variable Z = X(2) + X(3) + X(4). It is the random variables Y, Z, and ones of a more general/arbitrary form, that I want to find a formula for their probability distributions.

The reason I want to do this is I'd like to continue developing an RPG system, and these probabilities tie into the basic combat/skill use and leveling system. While this is all kinda complex sounding, the actual rule of "roll 4 d6's, add the lowest two" or something like that is a simple system. It's interesting, at least I think, to have a system whose rules are simple but the mathematics behind it make things interesting and more complex.

In addition to this, I've also been trying to force myself to do some narrative writing. Unfortunately, unless I'm feeling "inspired" I'm unhappy with the result, as I'm basically forcing myself to write. This is a current project that may go nowhere, and the first four paragraphs were ones where I was feeling "inspired", while the rest was me forcing myself. I'm not too happy with it so far, but I'm just gonna keep pushing myself.
I have two books "in the can" and a third that's basically there except for preliminary formatting, and I'm working on blurbs for them. Here's the blurb-in-progress for the latest.



Gray Area

Nine months ago, engineer Dave Novachek woke up aboard an alien craft. The creatures who took him were frail, curious, indifferent to human suffering--and poorly prepared for his escape. Enraged, Dave carved a path of revenge that left him and two other captives alone on a ship already headed to another star, unable to turn around.

Now young reporter Melinda Babcock is chasing rumors of a revolt on an alien planet, a diverse rabble of unwilling surgical test subjects, and relentless foes determined to recapture them. To get answers she visits the man who led the escape. Dave is easy to find, trapped at home by a newfound fear of the winter night sky--or of himself. For him and the others, desperate and outnumbered, the only way home was to exploit their enemy's greatest weakness: war.
In response to Lummox JR
Lummox JR wrote:
I have two books "in the can" and a third that's basically there except for preliminary formatting, and I'm working on blurbs for them. Here's the blurb-in-progress for the latest.

What do you think you're doing? Trying to have a work/life balance? We aren't donating so you can write your little blurbies, we pay you to MAINTAIN THE ENGINE.

In response to EmpirezTeam
Lmfao. You heard him Lummox.. get back to work!

This has been my project outside of BYOND for the past three weeks (Google Play).
In response to Mr_Goober
Mr_Goober wrote:

This has been my project outside of BYOND for the past three weeks (Google Play).

Looking good!
I made an macaroni owl today!! Lolz xDDD
Popisfizzy said:
Unfortunately, unless I'm feeling "inspired" I'm unhappy with the result [...]

Sounds like me not too long ago when I'd try to program. I find myself very driven lately though.

I'm not really doing anything outside of Byond project-wise. I am about to pick up Python as part of a Computer Science introductory book. One of my more immediate goals involve understanding better the ins and outs of programming.
In response to FKI
Well, I managed to distract myself again and am now working on compiling a Lexicon of Early Heartlandic/Late Cólþạrcic. Shouldn't really take too long, as the corpus is (obviously) quite small.

FKI wrote:
Sounds like me not too long ago when I'd try to program. I find myself very driven lately though.

Luckily for me, this is only for things I feel need an creative approach with a certain style of writing, and that's not most of the things I work on for hobby. I have floundered about before on not just narrative fiction, but also mathematics writing (e.g., writing proofs). Programming is a non-issue, though.
Outside of BYOND I'm working on car repair and house repair projects, for the most part.

I have a 2001 Kia Rio Manual that I'm trying to sell.

I have a 2003 Ford Explorer v6 AWD I just bought about a month ago that I need to replace/repair an exhaust hanger, rear wheel bearings, rear brake pads and rotors, front pads, and probably have to buy a transmission servo bore kit and get that replaced because Ford--in their infinite wisdom--decided to make the servo shafts out of hard steel while the transmission case is made out of soft aluminum so the shaft decides to wear down the bore and causes transmission fluid pressure loss. Last week I just finished taking the old differential out and putting a used one I got from a pick'n'pull. The old diff was popping because the gears were all broken and there was a chunk of metal that broke the case.

I have a 2007 Ford Focus that needs heater core flush and filled after I put a new water pump in a few days ago, also needs the new serp. belt I got put in. Then I gotta replace an outer tie rod, needs a wheel alignment, and then I have to fix some bibs and bobs like some surface-rust spots, a few interior items need fixed/tightened down.
(The reason for having Fords is because the GF is obsessed with the ideal that Fords are magical machines, but they're not. But gotta maker her happy so I bought them. Next year the Focus will be replaced with a Chevy truck like I used to own. The Focus is just pushing 208k miles and the Exploder is just pushing 146k miles.)

I own a double-wide extended "manufactured home". A.k.a. a trailer. I just got done replacing flooring near the smaller bathroom because my sister who used to live with me, never told me about a water leak. I still have to replace some roof wood and get new shingles for the roof. Also, on my spare time I'm drafting and designing a new computer desk to build because I'm running out of real-estate having my spare PC and my 17" laptop all on one desk, along with my airsoft battery/battery charger, my powertool battery charger, and a few other stuff.

For me lately it's been cars, computers, and home owner issues.
I'm working on a website design inspired by steam in my free time. Just started working on it, but here is a crude mock-up.

Did a bit more:
I'm writing multiple books to go into my personal library :D (aka books i write just to help me get better at writing/telling a story :P!!!)

In response to Ghost of ET
Ghost of ET wrote:
I'm writing multiple books to go into my personal library :D (aka books i write just to help me get better at writing/telling a story :P!!!)

Perhaps you haven't figured it out yet, but this thread is "pics or it never happened". Show us the books or else they don't exist.
Edit

Fine it never happened :P ignore that picture Dx
The lexicon of Early Heartlandic/Late Cólþạrcic is coming along decently enough. Assuming I counted correctly, I'm up to 142 entries. That is not 142 distinct morphemes, though, as there are four pairs of allomorphs.

A morpheme is a basic semantic unit, i.e. a "unit of meaning". For example, dog and cat are morphemes, but so are -ing (e.g., running) and -ed (talked). Sometimes, morphemes have what are called allomorphs, which are variations of a single morpheme that are phonologically distinct but still "the same" morpheme. For example, a and an sound different, but they are basically "the same word" in that they have the exact same meaning, and can't freely replace one another (they have a complementary distribution: one shows up in all the places the other can't, and vice-versa). Another example is -ed, which has different phonological realizations in each of hunted, fished, and buzzed.

In my lexicon so far, the pairs are cëléṭ-/-cléṭ- book; cërét-/-crét- place, location; tëral-/-tral- bravery, courage; and pëla-/-pla- to die. The first in each pair occurs at the beginning of a word, while the second appears in the middle or end of a word. Compare, Niljur o crtmar "This is the place" vs. Niljur o apjorpcrtmar "This is the battlefield [lit. battling's-place]". This distinction developed because Early Heartlandic/Late Cólþạrcic did not allow for consonant clusters to appear at the beginning of words, so morphemes that were of the form -CCR- where C is a consonant and R is the rest of the morpheme inserted an epenthetic schwa after the first consonant to allow them to appear word-initially as CCR-. pëla-, though, is interesting as it was the original form of the word, and it got merged into the pattern by people instead dropping the schwa to give it the form -pla-.

Getting back to the lexicon, unfortunately a lot of those are subject to change, most specifically the inflectional morphemes as well as pronouns and determiners. As I get a clearer idea of what I want for the transition from Middle Cólþạrcic to Late Cólþạrcic, I'll revise things. For example, all nominal declensional morphemes have two variants: one indicates the noun its modifying is definite (e.g., like how "the" in "the dog" indicates we know which dog is being referred to), while the other is non-definite (it may or may not be definite depending on context). I have an idea of how this distinction came about, involving a definite marking morpheme in Early and Middle Cólþạrcic getting merged into the suffix in Late Cólþạrcic, but it requires me to do revising for a lot of those morphemes already there. This same definite marking morpheme will also make some impact in changes to the demonstrative pronouns.
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