ID:2350627
 
How many people here work in the software development industry outside of BYOND? If so, what type of work do you do and what languages do you use? I was a bit curious of this after reading a few top posts citing someone's development experience/lack thereof.

I mostly work on web applications utilizing PL/SQL, html, css, and javascript with some occasional perl, java, c# and etc to support those applications.
I do various things at my company. UWP, WPF, Office VSTO plugins, JavaScript/Node.js, Ruby/Rails, Elixir/Phoenix...
I'm a .NET application developer, working mostly with PL/SQL, C# and jQuery
Scraping Google images, notes and references on a Windows Virtual-Client.
Intensity.
Subliminal mind-mastery.
Sensory overload.

Google drones.
Terraforming continents.
Woodchop.
Nice. Guess it's a bit interesting that a similar technology stack seems to be pretty common. I was almost certain that a lot of people on Byond would be hobbyists turned professionals but I guess not.
I work building web applications and mobile apps.

ASP.NET core -- Web API and MVC
Entity Framework core
React JS
AngularJS
ECMAscript 6 (Modern JavaScript)
jQuery (not if i can avoid it lol)
React Native for mobile
SQL Server
Bootstrap 2/3/4 and Material Design
In response to Soldierman
Soldierman wrote:
I work building web applications and mobile apps.

ASP.NET core -- Web API and MVC
Entity Framework core
React JS
AngularJS
ECMAscript 6 (Modern JavaScript)
jQuery (not if i can avoid it lol)
React Native for mobile
SQL Server
Bootstrap 2/3/4 and Material Design

Fundamentally the same thing as I work with. We don't use React or a whole lot of Angular at my workplace though. It's mostly ODP & Entity Framework.
I'm a very old-school BYONDer, starting around 14 years ago! Now I'm a Java & Go developer working on web apps :)
It makes you wonder how many people BYOND has turned into professional developers over the years. I started here in 2002 and I remember it took me forever to figure out what a variable was until I found a tutorial that helped.

Then I started taking parts of demos and open source projects to hack together a rpg game. Then I started making things on my own once I got better at developing. I never did finish any of my BYOND projects. But, I realize now that the scale was too large for one person to work on it in spare time.
In response to Soldierman
Soldierman wrote:
It makes you wonder how many people BYOND has turned into professional developers over the years.

Makes you wonder why BYOND refuses to leverage the expertise of its community for the software itself 😂
In response to Airjoe
Airjoe wrote:
Makes you wonder why BYOND refuses to leverage the expertise of its community for the software itself Ÿ˜‚

Yeah, it is such a huge project to try to iron-man by yourself and actually stay competitive; with competitors like Unreal Engine, Unity, etc. out there that offer so much more every single day.

The main thing BYOND has going for it is its simplicity to get a game up and going compared to competitors -- other than that I don't see much. Plus, this point could also be a negative as it probably attracts more noobs than professional developers.

It would be interesting if BYOND just built an open source API that lets us access our running servers and hub. Then the community would be able to do a lot of the heavy lifting like building clients. Open source the dream seeker and web client too. That way we could improve them or build native Android, iOS, etc. apps (whatever we want).

Also, open source the IDE so we could help improve it or rewrite one that is cross platform. I know there has been some attempts to make such an IDE that failed, but open sourcing the existing one might help.

Could also build a Web API so that the front-end code for the website would be pure html, css, and javascript. This could allow the community to contribute to improving the website via pull request. We could write the front-end code in Angular, React, or VUE. Obviously the person working on the web API would have to be trusted and that couldn't be open sourced.

Then Lummox JR could just focus on core functionality in the language, the compiler, etc.

Just my 2 cents.
Kinda just pinged into BYOND off of a facebook whim, but yeah, my playing with programming started on trying to fix up some nasty nasty DBZ source code when I was 14, and I've since gone on to do software engineering as a career.

My LinkedIn probably covers well enough the work I do:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenbadger/

Pretty much backend enterprise Java fun, with some technical team management and developer practices stuff mixed in thanks to my Jenkins experience.
software developer (primarily javascript/node/python) at Crysberg A/S in Kvistgrd, Denmark. currently riding shotgun on development of a browser front-end for water management systems (starting/stopping/setting timers for valves, pumps, sprinklers, etc.) using the Vue.js framework.

Since Stephen did it, I, too, shall provide the requisite linkedin profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimmpratt/

And for a more historical (hysterical?) perspective, I refer you to the gospel of the digitalmouse: http://www.byond.com/ forum/?post=808851&page=6&hla=digitalmouse#comment20210117
In response to Airjoe
Airjoe wrote:
Makes you wonder why BYOND refuses to leverage the expertise of its community for the software itself Ÿœ€š

I suspect that it is largely because *at the time* of early BYOND development (pre-Lummox days) most of you were just coming out of diapers and the 'oldbies' were establishing or maintaining our own careers and families. plus there was an incentive to monetize BYOND to be self-sufficient, if not profitable, so 'open sourcing' was not a viable option.

is it now? that is up for debate or discussion with those in control of the intellectual property rights.
I'll admit I still haven't worked for any business. However, I have been involved with personal projects outside of BYOND. One happens to be a virtual computer that is getting closer to public release (with a goal of actually open sourcing it). A few already know project to be ClassicVCom HD (a retro meets modern virtual computer). Built purely in C++ (with SDL 2.0 to leverage it and eventually ASIO for networking support).

In fact, it seems to have become a trend to see virtual computers popping up. Look at PICO-8 or a variety of others. I even found more are working on such projects right now through the Game Dev League Discord. If I get it released this year or next, I will make the source and documents available. I would not mind one bit if anyone forks it. ;)

As for my other future frontiers, I actually want to experiment with a Vulkan-based engine of my own design just to see what could be accomplished. I might even share the results of any research that comes from that endeavor. Plus, I'm also looking into Rust as a programming language after some encouragement. So far, I'm very impressed with it regardless of not being fully mature yet. I may consider using that language for future projects.

Anyhow, it's nice to see a number of y'all again. ;)

Edit: I would like to add one more thing. ClassicVCom HD does in fact utilize it's own assembly language. One nice perk behind that is you could build your own assembler or even a compiler for an existing language. I'm thinking about building a C compiler based on an older standard as my virtual computer does not have any functioning floating point registers.
In response to digitalmouse
digitalmouse wrote:
software developer (primarily javascript/node/python) at Crysberg A/S in Kvistgrd, Denmark. currently riding shotgun on development of a browser front-end for water management systems (starting/stopping/setting timers for valves, pumps, sprinklers, etc.) using the Vue.js framework.

Always good to see you post digi. Means I'm not quite the oldest one still around ;)


Me? I am a Unity Game Engine Game Developer.

I don't work for any company as I am still in training.

I am pursuing a B.S. degree in computer science.

I know at least some of C#, Java, C++ and I used to know some DM.