ID:276817
 
Wow thats a waste of time for them have they not got anything better to do lazy apple eaters
In response to A.T.H.K (#1)
A.T.H.K wrote:
Wow thats a waste of time for them have they not got anything better to do lazy apple eaters

I have no idea what that means, but I'm quite excited that soon I'll be able to have hardware on which I can do all my BYOND stuff and my other stuff from the same machine.

I have used Virtual PC in the past to do BYOND work, but it was slow for some things and I couldn't get the networking right. In this case, I should have no problem.
Doesn't booting windows on a mac sort of defeat the purpose of a mac. I thought macs were supposed to be secure, installing windows is going to make it 100% less secure
In response to Critical (#3)
It does make it less secure, but you might as well say that dual-booting Windows and Linux defeats the purpose of using Linux.

It's sometimes handy to have several OSes installed. There are Windows programs that won't normally run on Macs (graphical BYOND being a case in point), some Mac users develop for the Windows platform, and some people just like keeping their options open.
In response to Deadron (#2)
Deadron wrote:
I have used Virtual PC in the past to do BYOND work, but it was slow for some things and I couldn't get the networking right. In this case, I should have no problem.

Never had much trouble with networking in Virtual PC, but yes it is incredibly slow. But now that CPU emulation is out of the equation, I'd think a virtualization solution would be far better for most needs other than high-powered 3-d gaming. Why continually reboot when you can have both environments side by side, both running at native speeds? Rebooting is such a huge pain - close everything you're working on, make sure you save it all, hope you remember where you left off, etc. Screw that.

There's at least one solution available now in beta now: Parallels. Looks promising, and very reasonably priced. VMware just recently confirmed publicly that they have a OS X on Intel version in the works. And I'll bet Microsoft is last to the party with Virtual PC. One of these will let me have my cake and eat it too (that is, once I get an Intel Mac... maybe sometime this decade?).
In response to Mike H (#5)
Mike H wrote:
Never had much trouble with networking in Virtual PC

I could do general networking, but I couldn't get BYOND games to connect. I suspect that BYOND may require ports that OS X has closed?


Why continually reboot when you can have both environments side by side, both running at native speeds?

I have no objection! I will be in 3rd or 4th heaven if a quality virtualization solution comes about. Then I can sit on the couch and do my website coding (done in OS X only of course!) or my BYOND coding or have a BYOND game up while I get things done, etc.
Ah-ha! Get it? I reversed it!

Eh, don't get what I mean? Well, what I want is a retail version of OSX that will natively boot and install on a standard PC; no more of this "OSX on x86" hackery stuffs - I want the real McCoy!
~Kujila
In response to Kujila (#7)
Kujila wrote:
Well, what I want is a retail version of OSX that will natively boot and install on a standard PC


Never going to happen, because it would destroy Apple's advantage. For Apple it's all about the hardware/software combination, not just one or the other.

Boot Camp is a smart move because it gives PC users all the more incentive to finally switch. A lot of Mac users own a PC on top of their Mac so that they can perform Window's tasks, but this completely eliminates the need to worry about that.
In response to Deadron (#6)
Deadron wrote:
Mike H wrote:
Never had much trouble with networking in Virtual PC

I could do general networking, but I couldn't get BYOND games to connect. I suspect that BYOND may require ports that OS X has closed?


I always just rebooted my laptop into OS 9 to run Virtual PC, because it runs much faster in 9 than it does in OS X. Luckily for me I purchased my Powerbook right before Apple elminated the ability to boot up in both OS X and OS 9. Although Virtual PC was a lot less buggy under OS 9, it still drove me insane and I eventually just bought a new PC.

I have a brand new iMac G5, but Boot Camp has definitely piqued my interest in purchasing a new Intel Powerbook Pro. If Apple gets around to adding a two-button mouse configuration to the built-in trackpad, I'll probably bite.
In response to SilkWizard (#8)
SilkWizard wrote:
Kujila wrote:
Well, what I want is a retail version of OSX that will natively boot and install on a standard PC


Never going to happen, because it would destroy Apple's advantage. For Apple it's all about the hardware/software combination, not just one or the other.

Boot Camp is a smart move because it gives PC users all the more incentive to finally switch. A lot of Mac users own a PC on top of their Mac so that they can perform Window's tasks, but this completely eliminates the need to worry about that.

Considering they have an Intel version of Mac Os x its not too hard assuming you have a generic set of hardware to get OS-X run on a normal PC. I managed to get a copy and boot it on my computer, sound drivers and network were missing but im sure someone will probably find a way around it, they always do
In response to SilkWizard (#9)
SilkWizard wrote:
I always just rebooted my laptop into OS 9 to run Virtual PC, because it runs much faster in 9 than it does in OS X.

OS 9 makes my eyes bleed. Thankfully, I haven't even had Classic on my machine in years...ah, to hear the angels singing!

(To make this possible, I had to have my team create our own OS X version of a major app we used to use in OS 9...the benefits of being an engineering manager!)
In response to SilkWizard (#9)
SilkWizard wrote:
I have a brand new iMac G5, but Boot Camp has definitely piqued my interest in purchasing a new Intel Powerbook Pro. If Apple gets around to adding a two-button mouse configuration to the built-in trackpad, I'll probably bite.

Same here, It all is coming together very nicely. If they add a two button mouse, forget the regular non-mac computers.
In response to Deadron (#11)
Deadron wrote:
OS 9 makes my eyes bleed.

Yeah, don't get me wrong: I LOATHE OS 9 and pretty much every Mac OS that came before it. I was actually a big Mac-hater before Final Cut Pro came out, and the first time that I used OS X I officially became an Apple convert.


I had to have my team create our own OS X version of a major app we used to use in OS 9...the benefits of being an engineering manager!)

Wow, that's awesome. I hated having to run applications in Classic mode back before most everything was ported to OS X.
In response to Critical (#10)
Critical wrote:
I managed to get a copy and boot it on my computer, sound drivers and network were missing but im sure someone will probably find a way around it, they always do


Yeah, but there is a big difference between that and an official port... the mainstream consumer isn't going to go that route. The pirated ports of OS X for PCs probably aren't going to have much of an impact on Apple's sales.
In response to Critical (#3)
Critical wrote:
Doesn't booting windows on a mac sort of defeat the purpose of a mac. I thought macs were supposed to be secure, installing windows is going to make it 100% less secure

No, according to a newspaper article I read during school, the Windows parition will be as secure as Windows normally is (Not saying much...,) but BECAUSE you have to reboot to switch to the Mac OS, all your Mac files are completely safe.

From what I read, it sounds pretty awesome. I think it's about time I let my dad buy a Mac ;)
Exactly how compatable will the dual boot be though? Like say I got Quake 4, what kind of MAC chip am I going to need to play it?

I might consider it when I get a new PC, but Id need more info.