Event Apr 11 2012, 12:00 am
to Apr 24 2012, 12:00 am
ID:656337
 
Keywords: sauce, tartar
http://www.roguetemple.com/7drl/

Just came across a site that had a great idea for a contest. It's called Seven Day Roguelike ( 7DRL for short ), and the name is self-explanatory.

BYOND is lacking in roguelikes, which is weird since BYOND seems like the perfect engine to whip up a quick dungeon crawler. Either we don't have any roguelike fans on BYOND, or there's just no one attempting to make one.

Anyway, I haven't made anything in ages, so I'm challenging you all as well as myself to create a roguelike in seven days. There is no prize for this contest. Your reward is knowing you could create a fun dungeon crawler in 7 days, and who knows, with a little more polishing afterwards, that game could become the next award-winning roguelike.

You must stop development at 168 hours or less. You also must leave a post saying you're starting, and at that moment your 7 day time limit begins. You can use libraries, resources, all that good stuff. You can also plan your game before starting, meaning you don't have to leave your "I'm starting" post before you write up ideas of what kind of roguelike you're going to make. The final rule is that this contest is for April only, meaning the latest you can start your game is on the 24th - any later and your 7th day will go into May.

With that said, I'll probably start mine this week. Let the games begin! I'm expecting an entire 2 people to participate in this, so I know this is going to be one wild event!
I'd really love to see some Rougelike games created, I'm a fan as well. I won't be tackling this contest because of other current projects in the works, but I'd like to encourage those with empty hands to try this out. :)
That makes me want to learn how to program.
I am a major roguelike fan. I spent years playing Diablo 2 online. The only thing that has kept me away from this is lack of knowledge, or more recently just being busy with other projects.

Unfortunately, due to another project; I won't be participating. However. I do hope this brings forth at least one good roguelike, and I may contribute one to BYOND someday if I can manage it. BYOND definitely needs more of them.
Someone should totally make an easy to use base for Rogue-Likes. Then, we may see some more.
In response to Vrocaan (#4)
We need something like that for a few game types, actually. A good framework for each major game type could help BYOND a lot, and hopefully reduce rips, fang games, and such.

It's something I plan to look into doing someday; if I can get good enough at programming to feel comfortable releasing something like that. It does need to be well made, after all, and what is considered well made is very debatable on BYOND; since there's always a better way to program something.

Anyway. Definitely need a good roguelike framework more than anything. Maybe this contest will at least result in one being released to make use of one of the entries that isn't turned into a full game.
In response to Toddab503 (#5)
Toddab503 wrote:
We need something like that for a few game types, actually. A good framework for each major game type could help BYOND a lot, and hopefully reduce rips, fang games, and such.

It's something I plan to look into doing someday; if I can get good enough at programming to feel comfortable releasing something like that. It does need to be well made, after all, and what is considered well made is very debatable on BYOND; since there's always a better way to program something.

I was working on a tactical RPG game that I was going to strip down and release as a framework once I had everything done, but my artist vanished and no one seemed interested, so I lost motivation and never finished it.

Also, I'll be entering this more than likely, but not today. I've been playing way too much Binding of Isaac, so it will probably have some similarities to that.

We were discussing making frameworks on Forum's blog last year. I can't remember what happened to that though. It was another one of those spur of the moment ideas that everyone just talks about and says "hell yeah, that's a great idea" and then a week later everyone forgot the discussion even took place.
I plan on doing this. I haven't played any roguelikes in I don't know how long. I need to catch up.

I know it isn't set it stone, but what would you guys say defines a roguelike? What things need to be present and what things vary more in games of the genre?
IMO, a roguelike is pretty much just a randomly generated, more or less hardcore(death = character deleted), and at least somewhat dungeon/level oriented game.

Some people would argue that a game like Binding of Isaac isn't a roguelike because it's not turn based, but by that logic Skyrim isn't an RPG because it doesn't involve character sheets, dice, and a dungeon master narrating for you.
Diablo II is a roguelike, if I recall correctly, and it is not turn based. For me I believe a roguelike would be an RPG game that has randomized, or generated maps that you can't entirely predict. A few more things I feel help contribute to a good roguelike is adding slight randomization into other things, such as equipment and what monsters appear in areas.

I really cannot think of a better example of a roguelike than Diablo and Diablo II, to be honest. I've played a few, but whenever I think of the word roguelike Diablo II takes over my mind.
This is pretty much what is considered to define the roguelike genre, more or less: http://www.roguetemple.com/roguelike-definition/
In response to Gurglor (#11)
Hm. That is very interesting. I didn't know turn based interaction was in roguelikes, much less such a big deal for one. This does, however, confirm that Diablo II is a rogue like.

At least in my opinion. I mean while it is debatable, I would say it has 3/6 high values, 3/3 middle values, and 1/4 low values so that covers the majority of the factors. Anyone know any games with more than 7 out of the 13 factors? I'd be interested to see them and how good they might be.

I also hope at least one of the entries steers clear of turn based, and aims for hack and slash though. That's definitely the type I enjoy most.
I'd consider Diablo games as rogue-lite, maybe. You definitely don't have to include all of those factors in your game. I'd say just claim the ones that you think will make the game fun, then go with your own design ideas for the rest.

DoomRL is a good example of a game that covers most of the list. And of course you have the classics: Rogue, Nethack, ADOM...
I'm seeing in many places that "stats" are required. What kind of stats is it referring to? Simple "strength, defense, etc."? Or something more complicated? Not going to lie to you, I never really got into roguelikes. I've played the Diablo games and plan on playing the 3rd, but I never really got into any others.
Roguelikes are based on tabletop Dungeons and Dragons. You can presumably develop any stat system you want, but the classic setup is Strength (attack power), Dexterity(accuracy), Constitution(resistance to disease and maybe a hit point bonus), Intelligence(potency of arcane magic), Wisdom(divine magic), and Charisma (social interaction).

Hit points, of course, are a measure of stamina or life force.

I'd say go with however many stats you're comfortable handling.
Simple stuff like str, def, speed, int, etc. It's not really anything major. You're making a 7 day roguelike, not the next World of Warcraft, so you really don't need to go into detail in that area. If you have more than 5 stats you're probably overdoing it. I've seen some games with STR, ATK, ENDURANCE, DEF, MAGIC ATK, MAGIC DEF, SPD, AGI, CRIT, DODGE, and more and it just makes my head hurt trying to keep up with all of it.

[Edit] Just found it. Look at this long list of unnecessary stats: http://blackrabbit2999.blogspot.com/2011/06/ eden-eternal-stats-attack-types-and.html
i'm game!
I agree with Empirez. Particularly if you haven't designed that type of game before, it's never a bad idea to err on the side of simplicity. You can always add layers of complexity (if they're NEEDED) after you have a working game, but getting bogged down in minutiae that adds little to the game will simply waste time. Worse, it can make your game more boring instead of more interesting.

Keep it simple and tight until you have a working game. Then add more complexity if the game wants it. It seems to me that Diablo does a pretty good job of condensing its stat set down. It keeps enough complexity to be interesting, but also keeps it simple enough so developers and players can focus on the action as well.

The class sytem I didn't care much for, but that's another matter.
I'm going to go out on a limb and go against random generation. I am very inexperienced with it, and will probably end up making the maps worse through it. I'll create some maps and have random enemies and items in them.
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