ID:198826
 
When I was doing the contest for IainPeregrine's Game in a Day (GIAD 2011) I felt pretty good about my entry, just one problem:

Iain 'quit' BYOND before judging the contest.

At this point I'm not even regarding the money prize. But I would have liked to know who got first, second... instead he went off to do the Occupy Providence in his area, and I guess he's still pretty hardcore about it. I mean it's a good cause and such. Just sucks that no one will know.

So anyway, I'm thinking that I might want to host a contest, not necessarily within any limit of time, but rather via restrictions or barriers that would make development a little more challenging. A shortage of time also yields less quality in a game, so that's not good either.

Just thinking out loud I suppose. But I might follow up on that. And prizes? Well, I'm not a rich man, but I could spare a membership to whoever wins, and we could do a donation pot like in GIAD 2011, which would make things much more interesting.
I would like to participate in something like this. I never have before, and I think that recently my programming skills have become much sharper.
You don't even have to give a prize. If anything, a graphical medal would be enough. It's fun to compete and see who can come up with clever games.
In response to Branks (#2)
Branks wrote:
You don't even have to give a prize. If anything, a graphical medal would be enough. It's fun to compete and see who can come up with clever games.

Oh hey you're right. I could post the contest as a hub entry, and give medals that way. GENIUS!!

I'd be interested. Set a deadline that is short enough to require people to actually dedicate a few nights to do it, but long enough to where projects that might require a few nights to get things together (like mine last year with the graphics issue) can actually come to fruition (rather than never even get started because of the immediate lack of motivation the time constraint gave me).
I would like to see were this goes if it starts im up to pixel for anyone wanting to enter
I've been trying to get Iain to pass the submissions on to me, but his internet access has been so intermittent, I haven't been able to hold a conversation with him. I shot him another email just in case, since he popped on BYOND before the site update.

Anyways, on the topic of contest length, I thought a week worked out pretty well for BYOND Action's past GIAW. Enough freedom that scheduling isn't an issue, while still being imminent enough that people won't put it off and forget about it.
In response to DarkCampainger (#6)
DarkCampainger wrote:
I've been trying to get Iain to pass the submissions on to me, but his internet access has been so intermittent, I haven't been able to hold a conversation with him. I shot him another email just in case, since he popped on BYOND before the site update.

Anyways, on the topic of contest length, I thought a week worked out pretty well for BYOND Action's past GIAW. Enough freedom that scheduling isn't an issue, while still being imminent enough that people won't put it off and forget about it.

Maybe I could try something for either a week or two weeks. Either sounds pretty good to me.
Sounds interesting.
In response to DarkCampainger (#6)
DarkCampainger wrote:
Anyways, on the topic of contest length, I thought a week worked out pretty well for BYOND Action's past GIAW. Enough freedom that scheduling isn't an issue, while still being imminent enough that people won't put it off and forget about it.

Not really sure that I agree with that. From my interactions with those who had entered in the GIAW, most people put off working on the entry until the last few hours.
Perhaps the idea is that a week is not long enough to produce something notable, so participants procrastinate until they find a day they can spend on the entry?
I'm not sure.

You probably want to look into the old old contests with long development times, like the Iccusion Contest 2006 or the Cartridge Classic, as examples on how to run a contest that will yield impressive entries.

But anyhow, I don't believe that having a limited time to develop the entry is necessarily bad. I find the GIAD to be the most fun of all BYOND contests, and I look forward to it year after year; it's fun being inhumanly productive during the GIADs and there's nothing like the feeling of having completed your entry with a little under an hour left (help file time!).

Unfortunately, I am presently sitting on numerous contest entries that are waiting to get judged! I hope that the contests get judged soon :(
I'm currently waiting on judging results for the Cartridge Classic II and the GIAD2011. There was also the BASG2009 but that contest is never going to get judged...

If you end up disappearing before judging is complete, I will hunt you down.
BASG2009?
In response to LordAndrew (#10)
LordAndrew wrote:
BASG2009?

Build A Space Game 2009, I think.
Oh sweet, another contest. I'm in.
Ahoy. Sorry to look like I "quit" BYOND. I don't have internet access, that's all. Certain people who have ways of contacting me know that my mind is still here.

It is true that all my free time is poured into activism as part of the broader "Occupy" movement, though there are people like myself who feel that the occupy part of the movement is dead, and necessarily so. OP isn't what's keeping me from judging these days, though. Even when I do have internet (at college), I can't host.

Anyway, let's see if I can get my brain in order. I'm still floating around. I am constantly trying to get the GiaD 2011 finished. Dark Campainger is heading up that project right now. Contests are excellent. I'll probably hand off the GiaD 2012 to someone else if my internet situation doesn't improve. WebGL is awesome.

Edit: And you forgot to mention the BYOBG (build your own board game) hosted by Gug Hunter. I think Lummox disowned the CCII because of a lack of entries.