ID:182376
 
You start as a one celled organism, you end up exploring space and being able to do whatever you want with planets filled with civilizations downloaded from a central server that saves each persons creations on it. What a brilliant little game, not only that but its the new Sims2 basically with lots of mention to it being a brand not a one time game. So Spore will be amazing on its september 5th release and we can expect constant expansion packs to make the game that much more diverse and fun? Count me in.

Plus you can do more than build your creature from scratch, all vehicles and buildings can be custom created as well.

Im very excited.
I don't know about you. But I know people have played the demo and commented on it. They said it was not as great as they expected it would be. But I don't know, just make sure to play the demo before you buy it just to make sure. The way your saying it makes me want to buy it too. :D
In response to DarkGamer (#1)
The "demo" is only the creature creator, which is only a single aspect of the game itself.
In response to Popisfizzy (#2)
Well there is one. But I think my friend got a hold of a demo with most of the aspects of the game. But I don't remember, but it does not really matter. I'll just wait for the review when the game is out or I'll just buy it myself.
In response to DarkGamer (#3)
DarkGamer wrote:
Well there is one. But I think my friend got a hold of a demo with most of the aspects of the game. But I don't remember, but it does not really matter. I'll just wait for the review when the game is out or I'll just buy it myself.

Your "friend" is lying to you there is no "demo" except for creature creator.
Spore contains SecuROM. As such, I refuse to buy it - I consider SecuROM to go far to far in terms of copyright protection mechanisms. I really don't care about anything confined to the disk, or about serial keys, but the instant you start installing optical driver filter drivers and explorer shell extensions and undeletable registry keys, I beg out. Same reason I haven't bought Bioshock.

I'd consider buying the game, then downloading and playing a pirate version minus the DRM, but given how much Spore is an online game, that seems somewhat pointless. That, and I've got a terrible net connection. :P
In response to Jp (#5)
You can probably buy it right off the EA site and download it there.

But Spore isn't going to have the invasive SecuROM, the one that actually dials home and whatnot. Just the standard SecuROM that pretty much every other PC game has had for the past 10 years. They were going to put the dial home every couple of weeks version on it, but consumer outcry stopped them. I'll probably by my copy digitally though.
In response to Danial.Beta (#6)
Don't forget the limited activation thing. =/
In response to Danial.Beta (#6)
I really don't trust either EA or SecuROM - I'm pretty sure the online download versions have SecuROM in them, and regardless of whether it dials home or not, I just don't like the DRM. It's not just the dialing-home - I just do not like a program being installed on my computer soley for the purpose of constraining what I can do with it.

My approach thus far has just been not buying games that have it unless a patch removes it. So far, I don't have secuROM on my system.
In response to Jp (#8)
Meanwhile, everyone has ascended to a Spore-based heavenly realm, having tea-parties with angels and listening to spoken-word performances from God and Jp's kind of crouched there in his dark, damp cave, clutching nothing (well, the lack of something) to his shrivelled, grey chest.
In response to Elation (#9)
God is a pretentious beatnik. Screw that.

I much prefer my cave and shadow-puppets.
In response to Jp (#10)
In response to Elation (#9)
No, I'm totally done with EA as well and am not buying anything until I first find out what crap it does to trash my PC first. To make things worse the DRM is completely worthless. These games are cracked within days or even hours of a release and it's only the paying customers that have to deal with this total BS while the ones pirating it get away with not having to screw their PC. Why they think this helps prevent piracy is beyond me. So I'm not even going to buy it if someone does crack it I'm just not going to play it at all. People need to stop taking this and just quit playing their stuff altogether so they finally take the hint. If they're capable of that kind of thought anyway. Regardless piracy isn't really the issue. http://forums.galciv2.com/303512

I'll just stick with indie games since I doubt the PC gaming market will ever recover. More and more stuff is just becoming crappy console ports since consoles are where the big money is. Which only makes things worse since consoles are primarily just fighting over flashy graphics more than anything and doesn't exactly do the genres I like well anyway.

By supporting this crap you doom us all by showing them you're willing to take it and by not supporting it they just blame piracy.

[Edit] And annoyingly enough it's not just games you have to worry about. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ 2005_Sony_BMG_CD_copy_protection_scandal
In response to Theodis (#12)
Theodis wrote:
People need to stop taking this and just quit playing their stuff altogether so they finally take the hint.

Sadly, that won't happen on a large enough scale to matter in the least. DRM for games needs to go the same way DRM for music is -> Towards the trash bin. Its stupid beyond belief that companies haven't found out that they're losing more money on keeping DRM up to date and pissing off their paying customers than they ever would from piracy in the first place.
In response to Theodis (#12)
If we stop buying PC games, they will stop making them. Then all that will be left is console games, and I don't want to be responsible for killing PC games, do you?

The best thing you can do is get as many people as you can to call the game companies and ask them to stop using useless DRM.

That said, I've never owned a game that did anything more than check for the CD in the drive. And that's pretty easy to fake with the right tools, hardly DRM.
In response to Danial.Beta (#14)
If we stop buying PC games, they will stop making them. Then all that will be left is console games, and I don't want to be responsible for killing PC games, do you?

If they're bollocks then I couldn't care less- PC games would be deserved to be killed.

Calling them to complain then still buying up their products and making them money sends out a pretty interesting message, though probably not the one we want to put across. :P
In response to Elation (#15)
I think buying the game and then complaining about it to the company who made it is a fine way to do it. If they started getting crazy call volume, from paying customers, asking for the same thing, something tells me they would do what their customers wanted.

Point is, all PC games aren't bollocks. Like most game platform, some are good, some aren't.
In response to Danial.Beta (#16)
Danial.Beta wrote:
I think buying the game and then complaining about it to the company who made it is a fine way to do it. If they started getting crazy call volume, from paying customers, asking for the same thing, something tells me they would do what their customers wanted.

Or else what? The next time they do that, the customers will do the same thing? Why make the change when you'll be getting the same money anyways?
In response to Jon88 (#17)
Not listening to your customers is the quickest way to lose customers, and the game companies know it. They want people to keep paying for their product, so the word of a paying customer is about the best thing you can give them.
In response to Danial.Beta (#18)
Danial.Beta wrote:
Not listening to your customers is the quickest way to lose customers, and the game companies know it. They want people to keep paying for their product, so the word of a paying customer is about the best thing you can give them.

Yeah... but you're saying to let them off just this time and buy it anyways. And the next time? And after that? Some of us, like Theodis' post explains, are already at the point where we're fed up of asking nicely, and are more interested in developers like Stardock that respect their customers.
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