ID:151323
 
Well, I've always been wondering how I should start of with my project. Like, in what steps do I need to develop my game to completion. What do I have to do first, and then afterwards? So, I would like some tips from experienced developers how they start, what they develop first and in what order? Please be detailed, as this would help me a lot.

Yours truly, Raimo.
My process is generally:

1. An idea - Figure out what exactly I want to make.

2. Blueprint - How is the game going to work.

3. Code Essential features - Code enough so that the game functions in it's most basic form. Like if I was making a trading card game, I would code it so that players can duel with preset decks (this is to reduce coding).

4. Test - Make sure your game works at the core. If it doesn't work now, it won't work later.

5. Expand - Make it pretty, code in the full features.

6. Test/Polish - Make sure it still works. And works properly.

7. Game Complete!
In response to Lugia319 (#1)
Lugia's given you the basics to it, but possibly the most essential feature is the Blueprint. You need to keep accurate and up to date information on every mechanic, system, and the world itself. It's so easy to forget math formula's as well, those fit under mechanics. My current project has its own Development Environment to keep everything organized. Everything from stories to math and everything in between.
Lugia's plan is a good one. I would add that you really need to make sure your idea is fleshed out before you start coding. Don't have the story, setting, and characters be an afterthought that you add in once the game mechanics are coded. If you do that, trouble is guaranteed.
In response to Pepper2000 (#3)
Pepper2000 wrote:
Lugia's plan is a good one. I would add that you really need to make sure your idea is fleshed out before you start coding. Don't have the story, setting, and characters be an afterthought that you add in once the game mechanics are coded. If you do that, trouble is guaranteed.

Why is that? What trouble? That doesn't seem important at all to me. Gameplay mechanics should be the most important thing. The characters, story, and setting don't seem important to me at all.
(I don't make games based only around the story. I'm more like Miyamoto.)
Interesting gameplay elements do not need a plot.
In response to Complex Robot (#4)
If you don't intend to have a complex story, then that works just fine. But still, that decision must be made ahead of time.
In response to Pepper2000 (#5)
I still don't see how "trouble is guaranteed" if you don't plan out your story before making the game.
Honestly, I see that as being a huge roadblock, if you don't start development until you have a story.

Truthfully, I think you are just plain wrong.
Adding a story to any game is no trouble at all. There shouldn't be any reason to have to plan ahead for the story.

Unless there's an example you can actually come up with where it matters. (Instead of just saying it's true without any explanation.)
In response to Complex Robot (#6)
In response to Complex Robot (#6)
I'm speaking from personal experience, in that as I've fleshed out the story in the past, I've run into trouble. Here are some examples of problems I've had before:

- Is the world round? Especially with BYOND, it can be a paid to create a round (toroidal) world in which a player wraps from one side to another. The shape of the world is generally determined by the story/setting, so that should be known before map programming occurs.
- How do various stat/leveling elements relate to the story? For example, in the Final Fantasy games, key gameplay mechanical elements, such as the Magicite system or the materia system, are closely related to the plot. One could not have been tacked on to the other as an afterthought. For my current project, I want there to be in-game metaphysical explanations behind magic and whatnot that relate to the overall plot.
- I also try to have character personalities match their fighting style. Imagine if, in Final Fantasy IX, Steiner was a thief and Vivi a ninja. It wouldn't work.

Now, I'm not saying that every detail must be decided in advance. But I can't imagine programming a game without at least a rough idea of the history of the world, general plot, and the characters. But, I admit that different programmers have different styles, so if you work differently, that's fine.
In response to Pepper2000 (#8)
All of the things you mentioned are aesthetics and don't need to be planned for, given you're not making all sorts of mistakes with your coding. (Such as programming things to only work one way and be unchangeable or unable to work around or modify.)

I think your issue is that you're simply not experienced (coding-wise) enough to see that these things are mere aesthetics.

- Is the world round? Especially with BYOND, it can be a paid to create a round (toroidal) world in which a player wraps from one side to another. The shape of the world is generally determined by the story/setting, so that should be known before map programming occurs.

Map programming? If you want your map to wrap around, then add that feature. I don't see the problem here.

- How do various stat/leveling elements relate to the story? For example, in the Final Fantasy games, key gameplay mechanical elements, such as the Magicite system or the materia system, are closely related to the plot. One could not have been tacked on to the other as an afterthought. For my current project, I want there to be in-game metaphysical explanations behind magic and whatnot that relate to the overall plot.

I don't see how this is "tacked on as an afterthought." Those systems in the game can easily be features implemented as a gameplay mechanic and then worked into the story later. And if you have a feature that doesn't work. Remove it. If you need to add a feature. Add it. Simple as that.

- I also try to have character personalities match their fighting style. Imagine if, in Final Fantasy IX, Steiner was a thief and Vivi a ninja. It wouldn't work.

Once again, this is something easily changed later. I fail to see how choosing the character's role/personality should change whether or not you have the ability to have a ninja or thief in your game. (Unless you're doing something wrong, as mentioned earlier.) Because, the difference (gameplay-wise) between a thief and ninja is just their stats, abilities, and weapons in those games.