ID:181107
 
Well, my question is: How close does Visual Basic looks like DM?
It's less like DM than most other languages, actually. Java and Python are probably the closest you'll get to DM without it being DM.
Google is your friend

Source
<font face="Consolas">
<font color=green>' Allow easy reference to the System namespace classes.</font>
<font color=blue>Imports</font> System

<font color=green>' This module houses the application's entry point.</font>
<font color=blue>Public Module</font> modmain
<font color=green>' Main is the application's entry point.</font>
<font color=blue>Sub</font> Main()
<font color=green>' Write text to the console.</font>
Console.WriteLine (<font color=red>"Hello World using Visual Basic!"</font>)
<font color=blue>End Sub</font>
<font color=blue>End Module</font>
</font>

As you can see it's not very similar.
In response to Zaoshi (#2)
It may not be very similar, but you can obviously see how BYOND can help you understand different programming concepts, all of which generally apply to C++. You have the fact that you can't use a variable until you reference it as just a really simple example. It's a good way to get an easy start onto the programming scene, which is why I love it. The learning curve on DM is amazingly steep.
Visual Basic isn't exactly object oriented.

Go with Java/C#/Python if you want it to resemble DM in some way.
In response to Emasym (#4)
Emasym wrote:
Visual Basic isn't exactly object oriented.

Go with Java/C#/Python if you want it to resemble DM in some way.

Yea, for the very short time I was messing round with Visual Studio and C# I found them quite similar.