ID:151748
 
I've always wanted to make my own game on BYOND, coding side is easy for me, however I've always had problems finding Pixel Artist(s), Tester(s) and Player(s).

I'd like to know what game aspects addict you (the reader) to play RPG game (on BYOND). Maybe it's Combat System, or just Equipment System? Please tell me what the RPG game should have, to addict you.
Ripiz wrote:
I've always wanted to make my own game on BYOND, coding side is easy for me, however I've always had problems finding Pixel Artist(s), Tester(s) and Player(s).

I'd like to know what game aspects addict you (the reader) to play RPG game (on BYOND). Maybe it's Combat System, or just Equipment System? Please tell me what the RPG game should have, to addict you.


I find that the community has taken an incorrect turn when it comes to making a game. I had my own troubles aseembling a team to make games but now I am doing it on my own. The inspiration Should come from wanting to make something YOU want to play and hoping that a group of people share your same likes. Currently people are so worried about making fake "incs" and teams that they never really do anything (and when they do its because the person who got it all together was either willing to pay ot was a very good multi-talented person who only needed a few people, where as other teams of normal average skilled (one skill, two skill people) need more like 4-6 people to make a decent game.

The Idea is to stop focusing on the team aspect and more on the individual want. What do You want to play, and just go from there. What you think of will be your game, and if others happen to like it hey you found a crowd. Its best to atleast remotely model designs off of something mainstream that you and other people like (Diablo 2 for example).
" What makes RPG game popular?"

Advertising.
In response to Magicbeast20 (#2)
Advertising brings players to be able to judge your game. A feature list is the first thing. If it gets them inside the game, the fun of said features is the most important part. They also need replayability so the players will keep playing, and not leave after "achieving all possible goals."
Goals are always good, unless the path to achieving it requires 2 days of grinding or any other repetitive actions/quests.
In response to UmbrousSoul (#1)
I have been trying to find Pixel Artist for the game I'm making but it's no use, never been able to find one. I tried to make icons myself but they never turn out good. I tried using free resource icons, however they aren't good and many testers/players check icons in first place.

Currently I'm trying to make game I would like, some people say they like it, but play less than 5 min, can't really understand them.

I can code whole game without struggle, but what's the point without icons?
In response to Kaiochao (#3)
So you think feature list on the hub should help?
In response to Ripiz (#5)
If it's not a wall of text, and it has features that are actually fun.
Personally I believe a sense of accomplishment and how well the graphics fit the style of gameplay are my biggest factors, followed immediately by how easy it is to play the game.

Not how easy the game is mind you, because I love a challenging game, but how easy the game itself is to play. Everything you need is there, there isn't a good chunk of what you don't need, and you generally are given what you need to play the game.

Freedom of gameplay is also an aspect, a story can be as linear as you need it to, but the places in-between should be my choice. If I want to quest for my gain, grind kills for it, spend a little time on training games, or pvp for it. That should all be available for me if it's part of the gameplay, and none of it should be forced upon me as my only option.

Another thing I look for later on in the game, is how PvP is handled if it is such a game. If it's an involuntary part of the game then it had better be fair, meaning no guy who is considerably out of my range should be able to just run up and gank me without some sort of negative action (unless of course I started it).

Balance is also important, if one type of character rockets above others than there is no point in really playing the others. And in a growing RPG, anything I am given choice to alter (Stats, talents, hand-picked skills, etc...) should never be permanent.
In response to The Naked Ninja (#7)
The Naked Ninja wrote:
Not how easy the game is mind you, because I love a challenging game, but how easy the game itself is to play. Everything you need is there, there isn't a good chunk of what you don't need, and you generally are given what you need to play the game.
That sounds like you don't like games like those Naruto rips where you get 100 verbs in one panel and use only one verb?

The Naked Ninja wrote:
Freedom of gameplay is also an aspect, a story can be as linear as you need it to, but the places in-between should be my choice. If I want to quest for my gain, grind kills for it, spend a little time on training games, or pvp for it. That should all be available for me if it's part of the gameplay, and none of it should be forced upon me as my only option.
Does that mean you wouldn't play a game where's the only choice is monster killing? (quests would include monster killing too)

The Naked Ninja wrote:
Balance is also important, if one type of character rockets above others than there is no point in really playing the others. And in a growing RPG, anything I am given choice to alter (Stats, talents, hand-picked skills, etc...) should never be permanent.
Hate to fail in build, eh? Or just want to experiment?
In response to Ripiz (#8)
Ripiz wrote:>
Does that mean you wouldn't play a game where's the only choice is monster killing? (quests would include monster killing too)

I might as long as it's captivating, that covers 2 of the biggest things to look for in an RPG gameplay.

The Naked Ninja wrote:
Balance is also important, if one type of character rockets above others than there is no point in really playing the others. And in a growing RPG, anything I am given choice to alter (Stats, talents, hand-picked skills, etc...) should never be permanent.
Hate to fail in build, eh? Or just want to experiment?

A little of both really. If you're given multiple options to progress your character each level say, I'd like to play around with them rather than having to build multiple different characters with the same options.
In response to The Naked Ninja (#7)
The Naked Ninja wrote:
Personally I believe a sense of accomplishment

I think that's important in pretty much every game, and actually I find that's what I'm looking for most of the time when I go browsing around for games to play.

For example: a tower defense game where you face consistently harder waves of enemies until inevitably you are crushed in defeat. What fun is that? You know from the beginning that you're going to lose and its only a matter of when. I'd much rather play a game where I have a fair chance of beating each level and I just have to make it through using my own strategy. I win the level, I just acquired a sense of accomplishment - I successfully defended my tower.

Or maybe a metroid-esque or zelda-like exploration/adventure game - when you find a hidden chamber with cool treasures, or you acquire the next new gadget, you get that sense of accomplishment and you feel good about it, versus playing a game with infinite randomly generated levels with nothing to find...

And a lot of the professional casual games I've seen have you getting goodies when you accomplish something, such as a new background picture or a screen saver.
In response to Foomer (#10)
Foomer wrote:
The Naked Ninja wrote:
Personally I believe a sense of accomplishment

I think that's important in pretty much every game, and actually I find that's what I'm looking for most of the time when I go browsing around for games to play.

For example: a tower defense game where you face consistently harder waves of enemies until inevitably you are crushed in defeat. What fun is that? You know from the beginning that you're going to lose and its only a matter of when. I'd much rather play a game where I have a fair chance of beating each level and I just have to make it through using my own strategy. I win the level, I just acquired a sense of accomplishment - I successfully defended my tower.

Actually, Left4Dead's new gameplay mode, survival, is extremely popular, however it pits the players against endlessly increasing waves of zombies until you finally lose. Why is it so popular? Because like you said:

And a lot of the professional casual games I've seen have you getting goodies when you accomplish something, such as a new background picture or a screen saver.

High scores and achievements, in L4D's case. I just wanted to point out that the endlessly-difficult thing isn't always doomed to fail.
In response to Ripiz (#4)
Well you just have to take a look at the very well done SNES sprites and study how they are made and kind of base yours off of them. Without something to atleast look off of making pixel-based characters can be hard, but you can also suprise yourself when you just give it a little effort and less complaining. Most importantly not only do you have to try more than once but its good to Do aswell, trying only serves to disappoint. Just study some icons you like and then give it your best shot!

What I find with anything is that it will always take patience, even more so when drawing something.

Whats worse then not having or being able to make icons is not being a programmer being a designer and not being able to program whatever you want.

That is why people coloberate because not everyone can be a programmer and not everyone can do icons, unlike what people say on byond (Anyone can learn to program - BS).
In response to UmbrousSoul (#12)
Many people say you can program, either icon, both usually doesn't work, I think same. I can program however when it comes to icons I'm no good.

But believe me, I have tried making icons, they were really bad, or I just don't know where to start
In response to Ripiz (#13)
Have you tried reading tutorials on the Pixel Art forums? Google searching could point you to some drawing tutorials.
Just my opinions...

1. Success or failure is often decided in the first couple of minutes. I quit most RPG's as soon as I get killed within the first minute or when I get off track and lost. Your mid/end game can suck but your start game is what you have to nail. If I get invested, I will bitch and moan about stuff but will most likely stick around if I think it might get better.

2. I personally prefer a little more story/linear pathing (without knowing about it) to keep me on track. Open endedness usually makes me feel like I have to work too hard to figure out what's next.

3. It seems as though, RPG's are popular because they provide a few core things. SUPER EASY, LINEAR PLAY (usually not obvious), and MASSIVE MICRO REWARDS. Add some unique visuals and unique items with varying rarity and that is the recipe for success.

Again, just my opinions.
ts
In response to Tsfreaks (#15)
Having some direction in the beginning is important. That's usually not the case for MORPGs though. For example I played Stick World 2 and Teh Blobz recently and they both give you some tasks to do in the beginning, while I visited Seika (in single player) recently and found nothing but a village full of shops. No NPCs to talk to, no point. So I quit. Even an RPG intended for multiplayer can have some generic missions for players to go on in order to progress.
In response to Foomer (#16)
I did the same thing in Seika except for I ran until I died then left. I HATE going into shops at the start of a game for some reason. Loath.. more like.

ts
In response to Tsfreaks (#17)
Tsfreaks wrote:
I HATE going into shops at the start of a game for some reason.

I figure its because it announces to everyone that the game is officially a cliche MORPG where your goal is to buy equipment and kill stuff to gain levels. And that's it.
In response to Foomer (#18)
Reading stuff is work. Understanding stuff is work. I just want adventure with micro-bits of story thrown in. Need to make my own lazy RPG where you don't even move your character around, you just make simple choice (left/right) and then watch what happens like an interactive movie.

A choose your own adventure series...

Seriously... this should be done. I'd say I would do it but I'm far too lazy. lol

I think it would be an instant hit especially if done in a modular way (comic book / book series).

Again, seriously... a choose your own adventure with random rolls sounds pretty awesome right about now.

ts
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