ID:157947
 
I have an obj with 32x32 dmi icon. It has an underlay that is 41x39. When I show it on a grid sized 41x39, the grid shows the 32x32 version of the the underlay, and it shows the 32x32 icon fine. Even if i re-size the scale and make it bigger. It still shows the 32x32 version of the underlay. I also tried making the 32x32 icon an overlay, and the underlay to the main icon, but to no avail.

So my question is, How can i show multi-tiled icon in a grid? [besides the img tag, which can be done in my situation but i'd rather avoid that.]
Might as well double post?

        var/icon/I=new('background.PNG')
I.Blend(icon(icon,icon_state),ICON_OVERLAY)
fcopy(I,"temp/temp.png")
src<<output("<img src=\"temp/temp.png\">","Main.skillbar1:1,1")


It only shows temp.png's contents at compileation. Is there a way to tell the rsc that its been updated?
In response to Tubutas (#1)
Look up fcopy() before you use it. You're not updating the RSC. You're simply copying the file to a folder in the host's hard disk.
In response to Kaioken (#2)
I knew that, and that's why my question was how can i update the files in the rsc. Which i don't think is possible.
In response to Tubutas (#3)
fcopy_rsc()
In response to Garthor (#4)
Can I have that word used in a sentence?
In response to Tubutas (#5)
In response to Garthor (#6)
<pre>For example, when assigning a file() object to atom.icon, fcopy_rsc() is implicitly invoked.</pre>

I'm calling file() so fcopy_rsc() is already being called.

Edit:
In the code I posted I wasn't using file, slightly before this code i file()'d the tmp png, to no avail.
In response to Tubutas (#7)
If you read that line carefully, you'll realize that it's not calling file() that causes the file in question to be copied to the resource cache.
In response to Kaioken (#8)
Kaioken wrote:
If you read that line carefully, you'll realize that it's not calling file() that causes the file in question to be copied to the resource cache.

You mean fcopy_rsc()?
In response to Tubutas (#9)
See, what you're doing here is assuming that, when somebody is correcting you, they simply misspoke and are not actually correcting you.

What you SHOULD be doing is taking his damn advice. In this case, it means re-reading what you copied from the reference, CAREFULLY.
In response to Garthor (#10)
No need for the harsh language, and pardon me if I didn't understand, and I'm sorry about trying to further my knowledge of programming by asking a question.